International horse sports are chronicled in new Canadian magazine

Logo of International Horse Sport magazineHorse Sport International magazine reports on the news, politics and people that shape the international equestrian community.

The editorial strives to feature high-profile interviews, thought-provoking features from the most engaging people, and notable results from the world’s most important competitions.

The Aurora (Greater Toronto,) ON-based title is published 8 times per year by American Horse Publications. The print and digital magazines accept freelance writing and photography submissions. Editor is Pamela Young, HorseSportInternational@gmail.com

Advertisements

HOMEMADE WITH LOVE Targets Crafty Readers

HOMEMADE WITH LOVE is a new bimonthly magazine that provides inspiration and instruction for its crafty readers. It encourages them to explore their creative world through color, texture and taste.homemade with love blog post

This magazine is targeted at women who enjoy the hands-on experience of making and sharing things with friends and family. It includes beautiful photography, simple instructions, mood boards, inspirational books and “Meet the Maker” interviews. Extra themed sections include vintage and upcyling. Each issue contains 30 craft ideas.

Homemade With Love is based in Orpington, Kent in the UK, and is available in Europe, USA and Canada. Jane Rae is the editor, editorial@hmdwlove.com.

Losing my religion: Your view of Newsweek’s print demise depends on your ‘beliefs’

This was a week when everyone agreed on the questions.

Is it the death of one magazine, or a spreading epidemic that soon will wipe out an entire category?

Was it a natural death, or self-inflicted?

Is print, as a species, doomed to extinction?

But if we all shared the same questions, the answers depended greatly on what beliefs you brought to the table.

“Babies born now will never read anything in print.  Face the reality that print will eventually go away,” said Ben Horowitz, technology entrepreneur, speaking at the American Magazine Conference on October 17, 2012.

“Print is not dead.  NEWSWEEK* is committing suicide…” wrote Samir Husni, Mr. Magazine, in his blog entry for October 18, 2012—shortly after he tweeted that Tina Brown is the Dr. Kevorkian of the newsweeklies.  Ouch.

The juxtaposition of Newsweek’s print demise and the national magazine conference, in the same week, brought into sharp focus the industry’s most basic survival issues.

It also divided those involved with the industry according to their ‘religions,’ pitting Print True Believers who love the medium, like Husni, against Digital Zen adherents like Horowitz.  Others, who are Media Pragmatists, expressed the belief that while some magazine categories, such as fashion, may always have some physical print presence, screens and channels are destined to be where content lives out its life.

The truth is that Newsweek, like all newsweeklies, carried special burdens.  A weekly publishing schedule freights a magazine with higher printing and distribution costs.  And there was the squeeze of being caught between the frenzied 24/7 news cycle of the internet and cable, and monthly magazines, like THE ECONOMIST*, that have the time to produce quality, in-depth journalism with context.  Unable to be truly timely on one end or give thoughtful examination on the other, Newsweek often compensated with sensationalism and superficiality.

Will the magazine find contentment in its digital afterlife?  Your answer may depend on your religion.

Friday News Round-Up for October 19th

Hey, we’re all for seasonal favorites when it comes to food, but some ideas are just a bridge too far.  Comes word that Japanese Burger King restaurants currently are serving pumpkin burgers.  Think bacon burgers, but with lots of Jack-o-lantern slices added for good measure.  “Have it your way,” right?  Hmmm.   Before you go in search of that perfect snack, catch up on the industry news.  When you see an asterisk*, that indicates a title you’ll find in our Wooden Horse Database.

NEWSWEEK* magazine, in print since 1933, will cease its print edition and go all-digital at year’s end, Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown announced this week.  The final print issue is scheduled for December 31.  Cuts in editorial and business staffs are expected as a result of the changes…

NEWSWEEK* will relaunch in 2013 as a tablet-only magazine, titled NEWSWEEK GLOBAL…

L STYLE G STYLE, an Austin, Texas-based magazine targeting the LGBT community, will suspend publication while seeking investment to go national.  The publication only recently went from serving Austin, to covering the entire state…

SPORTS ILLUSTRATED* Editor-in-Chief and Time Inc Sports Group editor Terry McDonell stepped down from his post…

SPORTS ILLUSTRATED* tapped Chris Stone, chris_stone@simail.com, as the new managing editor.  Stone has been with the magazine for 20 years…

Time Inc named Paul Fichtenbaum as editor for the Sports Group, replacing the recently departed Terry McDonell…

REDBOOK* welcomed Leslie Robarge, lrobarge@hearst.com, as a deputy editor…

REDBOOK* welcomed Tiffany Blackstone, tblackstone@hearst.com, as a deputy editor…

REDBOOK* tapped Sarah Smith, no email available, as a deputy editor…

MAXIM* magazine brought in new assistant editor Cameron Berkman, cberkman@maxim.com and @camonrye…

CRAIN’S NEW YORK BUSINESS* promoted Jeremy Smerd, jsmerd@crainsnewyork.com and @smerd, to managing editor…

BOSTON MAGAZINE* welcomed associate digital editor for health Melissa Malamut, mmalamut@bostonmagazine.com and @melissamalamut…

Wednesday News Round-Up for October 17th

We spent some time over the weekend watching skydiver Felix Baumbartner’s 24-mile fall from the stratosphere to terra firma.  For those of us who get queasy on a Ferris wheel at the fair, it was pretty remarkable—remarkable meaning terrifying.  Anyhoo, check out the magazine industry news while you’re here.  As always, titles with an asterisk* can be found in our helpful Wooden Horse Database.

T: THE NEW YORK TIMES STYLE MAGAZINE will relaunch on February 17 of next year.  The glossy will sport a new look and higher-quality paper stock, as well as a broader range of culture and style topics related to fashion, beauty, art, design, travel and lifestyle.  Two of the four design-themed issues will be eliminated, as the magazine reduces frequency from 15 to 13 issues per year in 2013, but every issue will contain some design content…

VARIETY reportedly may move its headquarters away from its current Wilshire Boulevard location when its lease expires in February of 2014…

UPTOWN, a regional magazine in Winnipeg, Manitoba, is being absorbed by the Winnipeg Free Press, and will be relaunched as a newspaper supplement on November 1…

PRIVATE LABEL, PRIVATE LABEL INTERNATIONAL and PRIVATE LABEL CHINA, three B2B titles covering store-branded retail products, were acquired by Stagnito Media from E.W. Williams Publications.  The terms of the deal were undisclosed.  Stagnito plans to combine Private Label with their existing title, STORE BRANDS, to create a new magazine, PRIVATE LABEL→ STORE BRANDS…

HARPER’S BAZAAR* lost executive editor Kristina O’Neill, who had been with the magazine for 12 years…

WSJ. MAGAZINE* snagged Kristina O’Neill, Kristina.oneill@wsj.com, as the new editor-in-chief, beginning on October 29.  She replaces Deborah Needleman, who recently left to take the helm at T: THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE…

MARIE CLAIRE* bid farewell to executive editor Joyce Chang…

COSMOPOLITAN* tapped Joyce Chang, joycechang@hearst.com and @moycemarg, as the new executive editor…

TV GUIDE* brought in new executive editor Doug Brod, doug.brod@tvguidemagazine.com…

MEN’S HEALTH* promoted Julie Stewart, julie.stewart@rodale.com and @stewartjulie, as the assistant editor for the magazine…

POZ* magazine promoted Oriol Gutierrez, oriolg@poz.com and @oriolgutierrez, from deputy editor to the new editor-in-chief…

WHIRL MAGAZINE in Pittsburgh hired Andrea Bosco, abosco@whirlmagazine.com, as a senior editor overseeing both the home and wedding guide sections…

FRESH CUT food industry magazine named Lee Dean, fcedit@freshcut.com, as the new editor-in-chief…

Creating the illusion of good health: ‘Reverse retouching’ models touches off more controversy

Now that magazines are adding plumpness to models through ‘reverse retouching,’ maybe the industry’s attitudes about weight are changing, right?

Not so fast.

Back in May of this year, when VOGUE* agreed under pressure not to hire underweight models, it seemed there might be a shift afoot.  Many hoped it signaled a new recognition that looking and being healthy, rather than impossibly thin, should be the goal both for models and the young women who emulate them.

So when it came to light recently that many glossies like Vogue, SELF* and NEW YORK MAGAZINE* have been enhancing the curves of their cover girls, some may have wondered if voluptuous, Rubenesque figures were making a comeback.

After all, just look at the appeal of celebs like Beyonce, J-Lo, Kim Kardashian and Mad Men’s Christina Hendricks, none of them waif-like.

But reverse retouching is hardly new, and apparently signals nothing more than another unattainable physical goal: to have the legs, arms and torso of a competitive marathon runner, while sporting the bustline of a nursing mother with twins and the apple cheeks of a young child.

Even Barbie couldn’t match that.

And it’s more than simply adding cleavage, or enhancing someone’s booty to create the perfect hourglass figure.

In an article which appeared in the UK’s Daily Mail newspaper this spring, Leah Hardy, a former editor at COSMOPOLITAN*, revealed common the practice has been, and how things haven’t changed that much.  She detailed the way technology is used to soften the harsh, jutting bones of models’ sternums, collarbones and shoulder blades, laid bare from lack of normal body fat.  Sunken cheeks and eyes are photoshopped to appear bright and healthy.  Dull hair and skin is digitally revitalized.

Of course, she argues, then the magazine-reading public never gets to see that it’s impossible to be both sylphlike and buxom, or more importantly, malnourished and healthy.

Here is a link to the full article:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1279766/Former-Cosmo-editor-LEAH-HARDY-airbrushing-skinny-models-look-healthy-big-fat-dangerous-lie.html

Global glamour meets adventure in a new luxe travel magazine

ULTRATRAVEL NORTH AMERICA, a new US edition of the European ULTRATRAVEL MAGAZINE, has launched with a summer issue.

The luxury travel magazine targets affluent, active travelers interested in upscale experiences and adventures.  Readers will find articles and photo spreads about unique destinations, out-of-the-ordinary lodging, fashion, events, and activities in the US and around the globe.

Published by White Haus Media Group, the quarterly is available both in a large-format print edition and free digital version.  Sarah G. Harrelson, sarah@whitehausmediagroup.com, serves as editor-in-chief.  View the magazine at www.ultratravelusdigital.com.