New print magazine shows you how to live healthy but effortlessly and with great style

danny-seoNaturally, Danny Seo” is the title of a new print magazine from lifestyle guru Danny Seo and Harris Publications.

It “looks at living the healthy, natural and good for you life with a fresh, authoritative voice that covers everything from food, beauty, travel, home, and entertaining all through Danny’s unique point-of-view as America’s leading guru of green living,” according to its press release. It provides tips on how to live an easy sustainable and healthy life almost effortlessly with great style.

Danny Seo, danny@dannyseo.com, @DannySeoMag, is editor-in-chief. It launched in July 2014 with 350,000 copies at a newsstand price of $9.95. Issue two is planned for November 4, 2014 then the plan is to go quarterly in 2015 and to six-times-a-year in 2016.

Bauer Launches Three New Magazines – CLOSER, GIRL’S WORLD and CELEBRATE WITH WOMAN’S WORLD

Bauer logoGerman-owned media giant Bauer Publishing is launching three new magazines in the second half of 2013: CLOSER, GIRL’S WORLD and CELEBRATE WITH WOMAN’S WORLD. All three will rely on newsstand sales.

Closer is a new weekly magazine described as a hybrid of a celebrity weekly and women’s lifestyle magazine.

Bauer already published a magazine called CLOSER in Europe. Even though the US Closer will focus on celebrities, it will have a mix of other women-focused articles, unlike its European counterpart, which exclusively covers celebrities.

Closer will be targeted to an “underserved” segment of the population, Generation X, and will focus on their favorite stars, who publisher Marc Richards says are overlooked by other celebrity magazines. Rather than taking the rip-them-to-shreds approach, these unnamed Gen X stars will be portrayed in a positive light. The editorial will also provide authoritative advice on fashion, beauty, health, fitness, diet, recipes and decorating, all tailored to Generation X.

Closer will be launched in November with a marketing gimmick designed to grab readers: 2 million copies of the debut issue will be sold for 25 cents. After that the price will jump to $3.99. Annabel Vered is editor-in-chief.

Celebrate with Woman’s World is a new magazine that celebrates the holidays, seasons and special times of year. It’s an extension of WOMAN’S WORLD.

Woman’s World focuses on the needs and interests of today’s woman, both on a personal and on a family level. Editorial covers mind, body and spirit, as well as food, affordable fashion, craft ideas and home decorating.

Celebrate with Woman’s World will be published six times a year. Stephanie Sable is editor-in-chief of both Woman’s World publications.

Girl’s World is an introductory celebrity lifestyle magazine for girls 7 to 11. It will be published seven times a year and Marisa Sandora is editor-in-chief.

No email addresses are available at this time for these editors, and none of these magazines have an online presence yet.

Writers beware: Conde Nast looks to cash in on content

Yes, it is still about content.

Condé Nast CEO Charles Townsend talked this week about the company going in to 2013. He mentioned a rate-base increase for several brands; making more money from subscriptions, and forecasted the success of the Condé Nast Entertainment division (CNE.)

“Our print business, even in the worst moment, continues to grow and the margins are sharper and the gross profit margins are mouthwatering,” he said, according to wwd.com. “When this economy recovers, the print business is going to be on fire.”

But then, he said the same thing at the beginning of 2012, which was going to be “exceptionally sunny.” We now know that it wasn’t so with layoffs and most everybody taking budget cuts, and the web business coming in at about half the rate the company expected (15% growth versus 30%.)

And he’s hot on CNE, which develops, creates, produces and distributes original television, film and digital initiatives based on the company’s brands. Articles in Conde Nast magazines have already been turned into movies (“Brokeback Mountain,” “Eat, Pray Love” and the just released “Argo”) – but not by Conde Nast. That will change now with the creation of CNE.

CNE President Dawn Ostroff has said her division intends to take “some of the great stories from our magazines and do them for the screen ourselves.” She also has pointed out that there are some 80,000 articles in the Condé Nast archive as well as new content every week in their various magazines. All of which are now being read and considered for new endeavors.

But, Townsend said, there are still questions about who owns these stories, the company or the writer? According to wwd.com, “many contracts are expected to come up for review by the end of the year. Townsend said Condé is still working through the intricacies of those questions and clarified it’s trying to propose a partnership, not outright ownership. That means ‘more income for contributors but also ourselves,’ he said.”

Do we really believe he’ll be that charitable?

Writers, check your contracts.

Wednesday News Round-Up for October 24th

Were you among the breathless Apple fans anxiously awaiting the iPad mini’s debut yesterday?  Some were underwhelmed, in part because of cost.  While the size is indeed mini (weighing in at just .68 pounds), the price is not ($329).  It’s just $70 less than a full-size iPad, quite a bit higher than Kindle Fire.  Whatever device you’re reading this on, remember that all titles listed with an asterisk* here are included in the Wooden Horse Database.

NEWSWEEK* will actively push current subscribers to make a switch to the digital format ahead of closing the print magazine…

NEWSWEEK* reportedly is negotiating with Time Inc, which wants to buy Newsweek’s print subscriber list.  Time Inc purchased a subscriber list from US NEWS & WORLD REPORT* when its print product was shuttered…

HEALTHY COOKING magazine will shut down, and publisher Reader’s Digest Association will fold the title into TASTE OF HOME*.  Healthy Cooking’s 516,000 subscribers will be transferred to Taste of Home, and Taste of Home’s ‘Healthy Choices’ section will double in size…

TIME* debuted a website redesign, using “responsive design,” which adjusts for all media platforms, and is easier to navigate.  Visitors also will find a less cluttered layout with less red…

Publishers Rodale, Hearst and Time Inc are in talks with TV celeb Dr. Mehmet Oz to develop an eponymous health magazine…

WIRED* magazine announced it will increase its rate base for the eleventh consecutive year, hiking it to 825,000…

THE ADVOCATE*, the nation’s longest-running LGBT magazine, says rumors of its demise are completely false.  Erroneous reports claimed the publication would end at the end of 2012…

AMERICAN ARTIST* announced on October 17 that it has ceased publication after 75 years, and an estimated 45 employees will be laid off.  The magazine is published by Interweave, which was purchased by F + W Media in late July…

YOGA JOURNAL* will raise its rate base for 2013, from 350,000 to 375,000…

VEGETARIAN TIMES* is raising its rate base for next year, to 315,000…

ELLE* accessories director, Kate Davidson Hudson, has left the publication…

ELLE* senior accessories editor, Stefania Allen, has departed from the magazine…

HARPER’S BAZAAR* promoted Nicole Fritton, nfritton@hearst.com, to fashion market & accessories director…

HARPER’S BAZAAR* welcomed Joanna Hillman, jhillman@hearst.com and @johillman, as the new style director…

HARPER’S BAZAAR* named Elise Lipsky-Karasz, no email available, as the new features director, replacing Anamarie Wilson…

MARIE CLAIRE* no longer has assistant fashion editor Ashley Afriyie…

MARIE CLAIRE* promoted Jenna Blaha, jblaha@hearst.com, to assistant fashion editor…

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST* welcomed new associate market editor Stephanie Schomer, stephanie_schomer@condenast.com…

WSJ. MAGAZINE* now will have Ruth Altchek, ruth.altchek@wsj.com, overseeing both the weekly glossy and the WSJ lifestyle section, in the newly-created post of weekend editorial director…

FOOD & WINE* magazine welcomed new senior editor Kay Chun, kay.chun@aexp.com…

WHITEWALL art and lifestyle magazine named Amani Olu, amani@whitewallmag.com and @amaniolu, as managing editor…

HEALTHLEADERS magazine tapped Jacqueline Fellows, jfellows@healthleadersmedia.com and @JaxFellows, as the publication’s new editor…

Losing my religion: Your view of Newsweek’s print demise depends on your ‘beliefs’

This was a week when everyone agreed on the questions.

Is it the death of one magazine, or a spreading epidemic that soon will wipe out an entire category?

Was it a natural death, or self-inflicted?

Is print, as a species, doomed to extinction?

But if we all shared the same questions, the answers depended greatly on what beliefs you brought to the table.

“Babies born now will never read anything in print.  Face the reality that print will eventually go away,” said Ben Horowitz, technology entrepreneur, speaking at the American Magazine Conference on October 17, 2012.

“Print is not dead.  NEWSWEEK* is committing suicide…” wrote Samir Husni, Mr. Magazine, in his blog entry for October 18, 2012—shortly after he tweeted that Tina Brown is the Dr. Kevorkian of the newsweeklies.  Ouch.

The juxtaposition of Newsweek’s print demise and the national magazine conference, in the same week, brought into sharp focus the industry’s most basic survival issues.

It also divided those involved with the industry according to their ‘religions,’ pitting Print True Believers who love the medium, like Husni, against Digital Zen adherents like Horowitz.  Others, who are Media Pragmatists, expressed the belief that while some magazine categories, such as fashion, may always have some physical print presence, screens and channels are destined to be where content lives out its life.

The truth is that Newsweek, like all newsweeklies, carried special burdens.  A weekly publishing schedule freights a magazine with higher printing and distribution costs.  And there was the squeeze of being caught between the frenzied 24/7 news cycle of the internet and cable, and monthly magazines, like THE ECONOMIST*, that have the time to produce quality, in-depth journalism with context.  Unable to be truly timely on one end or give thoughtful examination on the other, Newsweek often compensated with sensationalism and superficiality.

Will the magazine find contentment in its digital afterlife?  Your answer may depend on your religion.

Friday News Round-Up for October 19th

Hey, we’re all for seasonal favorites when it comes to food, but some ideas are just a bridge too far.  Comes word that Japanese Burger King restaurants currently are serving pumpkin burgers.  Think bacon burgers, but with lots of Jack-o-lantern slices added for good measure.  “Have it your way,” right?  Hmmm.   Before you go in search of that perfect snack, catch up on the industry news.  When you see an asterisk*, that indicates a title you’ll find in our Wooden Horse Database.

NEWSWEEK* magazine, in print since 1933, will cease its print edition and go all-digital at year’s end, Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown announced this week.  The final print issue is scheduled for December 31.  Cuts in editorial and business staffs are expected as a result of the changes…

NEWSWEEK* will relaunch in 2013 as a tablet-only magazine, titled NEWSWEEK GLOBAL…

L STYLE G STYLE, an Austin, Texas-based magazine targeting the LGBT community, will suspend publication while seeking investment to go national.  The publication only recently went from serving Austin, to covering the entire state…

SPORTS ILLUSTRATED* Editor-in-Chief and Time Inc Sports Group editor Terry McDonell stepped down from his post…

SPORTS ILLUSTRATED* tapped Chris Stone, chris_stone@simail.com, as the new managing editor.  Stone has been with the magazine for 20 years…

Time Inc named Paul Fichtenbaum as editor for the Sports Group, replacing the recently departed Terry McDonell…

REDBOOK* welcomed Leslie Robarge, lrobarge@hearst.com, as a deputy editor…

REDBOOK* welcomed Tiffany Blackstone, tblackstone@hearst.com, as a deputy editor…

REDBOOK* tapped Sarah Smith, no email available, as a deputy editor…

MAXIM* magazine brought in new assistant editor Cameron Berkman, cberkman@maxim.com and @camonrye…

CRAIN’S NEW YORK BUSINESS* promoted Jeremy Smerd, jsmerd@crainsnewyork.com and @smerd, to managing editor…

BOSTON MAGAZINE* welcomed associate digital editor for health Melissa Malamut, mmalamut@bostonmagazine.com and @melissamalamut…

From grim outlook to grim reaper: Magazine staffers have reason to fear

Is it the return of the Grim Reaper, just in time for Halloween?

News came this week that the folks from management consulting firm McKinsey & Company are back at Time Inc., called in by CEO Laura Lang.

Despite Lang’s assurances that the consultants are there to work on consumer marketing issues, McKinsey’s presence creates some justifiable jumpiness among employees.  After all, the last time they made an appearance, in 2007, roughly 800 people were shown the door.

This also comes on the heels of an earlier visit this year from Bain & Co, which was hired by Lang in March to help right the ship at Time.

As if that wasn’t enough to make a staffer nervous, Conde Nast this week went on a two-day blood letting, axing an estimated 60 positions.  The move was the result of a recent company edict, directing all titles to cut an additional 5% from next year’s budget.  This in addition to the 10% they were asked to cut for 2012.

SELF* took the biggest blow, losing eight editorial staffers and three on the business side.  BRIDES* suffered too, cutting five from its editorial department and six in business.  It seemed there was nowhere to hide, with dismissals extending to most titles and up to the top floor, including two casualties in corporate communications.

So you can hardly blame those who remain at Time Inc, or any other magazine publisher, for feeling a bit like characters in a Halloween slasher movie, waiting to be picked off.

It seems the Grim Reaper shows up much more often these days.